Spam Email

Gosh spammers are starting to work hard.

Normally you can see from the email address that it’s rubbish – for example a recent ‘linked in invitation’ was fromĀ “LinkedIn.Invitations” <83F85A3@kannenberg.g2n.de>

Bit of a giveaway.

This one though is almost to a much higher standard (headers):

Return-path: <fussestw48@businessdirect.bt.com>
Envelope-to: X
Delivery-date: Tue, 16 Oct 2012 03:00:18 -0600
Received: from [61.16.242.20] (port=44252 helo=kol-static-20-242-16-61.direct.net.in)
	by XISP with esmtp (Exim 4.76)
	(envelope-from <fussestw48@businessdirect.bt.com>)
	id 1TO309-0005p0-F1
	for dave@incdev.com; Tue, 16 Oct 2012 03:00:18 -0600
Received: from eleusis.dabs.com (eleusis.dabs.com [194.70.94.161])
        (using TLSv1 with cipher RC4-MD5 (128/128 bits))
        (No client certificate requested)
        by mail2.bronco.co.uk (Postfix) with ESMTP id A491CF94889
        for <<X>> Tue, 16 Oct 2012 14:29:48 +0530
Received: from angelia1.intranet.dabs.com (10.200.0.175) by
 mail.intranet.dabs.com (10.220.0.101) with Microsoft SMTP Server (TLS) id
 8.1.436.0; Tue, 16 Oct 2012 14:29:48 +0530

Especially if you know that BT own Dabs.com…

The double angle brackets around my email address (replaced with X, ISP email server with XISP) are a bit of a presentation downfall, but the long faked headers (61.16.242.20) aren’t too bad. Bronco.co.uk?

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